community

Philadelphia Water Department Customers Can Win $100, Improve Services with New Survey

Any customer over 18 is eligible to take the Philadelphia Water survey available by texting @WATER to 39242. Participants will automatically enter a raffle to win one of many $100 gift cards.

As part of ongoing efforts to improve our work and better understand the needs of customers, the Philadelphia Water Department is conducting a comprehensive survey intended collect feedback on a wide range of services.

The 2017 Customer Feedback Survey, made possible through a partnership with the University of Pennsylvania, measures public opinion and allows the department to gauge what people in Philadelphia think about PWD and the services we provide.

Any customer over 18 is eligible to take the surveyParticipants will automatically enter a raffle to win one of many $100 gift cards. Survey instructions have been included in a flyer sent along with May 2017 water bills.

The survey can be accessed online here or by texting @WATER to 39242.

Come Out and Hear the Cobbs Creek Story!

“The valley of Cobb’s Creek, north of Market Street” by H. Parker Rolfe. Source: City Parks Association 1905-06 Annual Report. Credit: Adam Levine and Phillyh2o.org
“The valley of Cobb’s Creek, north of Market Street” by H. Parker Rolfe. Source: City Parks Association 1905-06 Annual Report. Credit: Adam Levine and Phillyh2o.org

We know that people who are aware of their local watershed and the challenges it faces—along with why that water is important—make for better stewards. They care about issues like keeping pet waste and litter out of the streets that ultimately drain into the watershed. And they know what an important role programs like Green City, Clean Waters play in protecting their watershed.

Encouraging that kind of engagement and knowledge is the goal guiding our efforts to collect and share the stories and history connected to the 22-square mile Cobbs Creek Watershed, which is part of the larger Darby-Cobbs Watershed, one of seven in the city. Cobbs Creek itself starts right around Haverford College and runs through the western suburbs and West Philadelphia before entering Darby Creek above the John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge near the Philadelphia International Airport (click here for an interactive watershed map).

Next week, we’ll be hosting a special talk about the history of Cobbs Creek with Adam Levine, a local historian who has spent two decades studying and documenting the history of water and waterways in Philadelphia. You would be hard pressed to find another person with more knowledge of what the city’s watersheds have been through since the first European settlers came here, and Levine’s presentations are always fascinating and informative.

Philadelphia Water Loves Our Parks

Some of the Green City, Clean Waters improvements at Dickinson Square Park. Credit: Philadelphia Water
Some of the Green City, Clean Waters improvements at Dickinson Square Park. Credit: Philadelphia Water

With the fall Love Your Park day of service upon us, we’ve been thinking about how much we love our parks and what the folks over at Philadelphia Parks & Recreation do every day to care for those spaces, making sure they are clean and safe.

Of course, with Fairmount Park’s historic role (in part) as a natural preserve designed to protect the city’s source water, you could say we’ve been a fan of Philly’s parks right from the beginning.

Today, Parks and Recreation is a vital partner in our Green City, Clean Waters program.

Join Us: Updates on E. Poplar and Point Breeze Green Infrastructure Improvements

We have two community meetings coming up this week to update residents on plans for green infrastructure improvements in their neighborhoods. These meetings are designed to provide important information about upcoming construction and to get feedback from neighbors, so if you live near one of these projects, please come out to learn more!

First up: East Poplar Playground and Field improvements

This map shows the location of proposed green infrastructure investments near the East Poplar neighborhood. Credit: Philadelphia Water.

This map shows the location of proposed green infrastructure investments near the East Poplar neighborhood. Click the map for a larger image in a new window. Credit: Philadelphia Water.

Philadelphia Water first started discussions in 2014 with Parks and Recreation, the West Poplar Community Development Corporation, members of the Teens 4 Good farm at 8th and Poplar and others to see how Green City, Clean Waters investments could improve the area and help manage stormwater in a green way.

Since then, we've used their feedback to inform plans for green stormwater infrastructure around the East Poplar Playground and nearby athletic field. In addition, we’ve planned several projects for nearby streets in the same neighborhood.

Our goal is to reduce the volume of polluted stormwater entering local sewers that connect to the Delaware River with green tools that beautify the area – but we’re working with neighbors to make sure that doesn’t impact community gardens or people playing sports on the field.
We’ll be hosting a meeting to update residents on the progress of stormwater management plans for the East Poplar neighborhood on Wednesday, Oct. 14 from 6-7 p.m. at the John F. Street Community Center, 1100 Poplar St.
Please click here to view a full size version of the meeting flyer.


Thursday, Oct. 15: Wharton Square Community Meeting


This map shows the location of proposed green infrastructure investments near the Point Breeze neighborhood. Credit: Philadelphia Water.
This map shows the location of proposed green infrastructure investments near the Point Breeze neighborhood. Click the map for a larger image in a new window. Credit: Philadelphia Water.

Talks about Green City, Clean Waters improvements around Wharton Square in the Point Breeze neighborhood are just getting started, so this is a great meeting for those who want to provide feedback and learn more about what this investment can bring to the neighborhood.

In addition to a project at Wharton Square, Philadelphia Water is also working on two vacant lots and several streets in the area. View the map above to see the locations of upcoming and completed projects. Please click here for a full size version of our meeting flyer and bring your neighbors to the Wharton Square Recreation Center, 23rd and Wharton streets, on Oct. 15 from 6-7 p.m.!

Northeast Residents Learn About New Green Sites

How a tree trench works. Click for more.
This diagram shows how a tree trench like the one planned for Moss Park collects and filters water before slowly releasing it into the ground. Click for more info.

Philadelphia Water held two community meetings in the Northeast in late August to talk about upcoming Green City, Clean Waters projects. Both projects will bring green infrastructure tools that manage stormwater to neighborhood recreation areas—the Max Myers Playground at Busleton and Magee avenues and Moss Park at Torresdale and Cheltenham avenues.

The Max Myers meeting was held Aug. 21 and covered plans for improvements to the park area and nearby streets that include two rain gardens and a stormwater storage basin beneath an existing baseball diamond. In addition to managing stormwater from the surrounding streets to address sewer overflows, the rain gardens will beautify the park with landscaping that includes plants and shrubs. Park users will also get a brand-new baseball diamond after the storage basin is complete.

Philadelphia Parks and Recreation is a partner for both projects, and Take Back Your Neighborhood, Councilwoman Quinones-Sanchez and Councilman Bobby Henon helped spread word about the Max Myers meeting.

The Moss Park meeting was held Aug. 24, and current plans include managing stormwater from nearby streets through the use of a tree trench featuring 16 new trees. As currently planned, the project will include replacing a weathered sidewalk along Ditman Street. The Moss improvements also include two new rain gardens, a new path, and an underground stormwater storage basin.
The Aug. 24 meeting was held with the help of Councilman Henon, Parks and Recreation, and the Wissinoming Civic Association.

Because the projects are still in the early planning phase, these meetings focused on getting feedback from residents and potential construction start dates aren’t yet available. Stay tuned at Phillywatersheds.org for more updates and look for invites for the next round of meetings about this project.

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